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Recommended reading for Science Fiction and Fantasy lovers!

January 5th, 2018 · No Comments · Books, City Library, Main Branch, Uncategorized, West Branch

January 2018

Bone Gap, by Laura Ruby. Eighteen-year-old Finn, an outsider in his quiet Midwestern town, is the only witness to the abduction of town favorite Roza, but his inability to distinguish between faces makes it difficult for him to help with the investigation, and subjects him to even more ridicule and bullying.

Broken Monsters, by Lauren Beukes. Detective Gabriella Versado investigates after disturbing displays that fuse the bodies of murder victims with those of animals are uncovered in abandoned Detroit buildings.

Cuckoo Song, by Frances Hardinge. In post-World War I England, eleven-year-old Triss nearly drowns in a millpond known as “The Grimmer” and emerges with memory gaps, aware that something is terribly wrong, and to try to set things right, she must meet a twisted architect who has designs on her family.

Dark Run, by Mike Brooks. Captain Ichabod Drift attempts to make a dark run, delivering a special cargo to Earth aboard the Keiko, a ship full of smugglers, soldiers of fortune and adventurers, who are actually the good guys in a corrupt galaxy.

The Girls at the Kingfisher Club: A Novel, by Genevive Valentine. This reimagining of the “Twelve Dancing Princesses” traces the story of a family of flappers who work in a 1920s speakeasy until their suspicious father decides to marry them off, prompting a confrontation with a bootlegger from the eldest sister’s past.

My Life as a White Trash Zombie, by Diana Rowland. Teenage delinquent Angel Crawford lives with her redneck father in the swamps of southern Louisiana. She’s a high school dropout, addicted to drugs and alcohol, and has a police record a mile long. But when she’s made into a zombie after a car crash, her addictions disappear, except for her all-consuming need to stay ‘alive’.

Shadowshaper, by Daniel Jose Older. When the murals painted on the walls of her Brooklyn neighborhood start to change and fade in front of her, Sierra Santiago realizes that something strange is going on–then she discovers her Puerto Rican family are shadowshapers and finds herself in a battle with an evil anthropologist for the lives of her family and friends.

The Census-Taker: A Novella, by Chine Miéville.  In a remote house on a hilltop, a lonely boy witnesses a profoundly traumatic event. He tries–and fails–to flee. Left alone with his increasingly deranged parent, he dreams of safety, of joining the other children in the town below, of escape. When at last a stranger knocks at his door, the boy senses that his days of isolation might be over. But by what authority does this man keep the meticulous records he carries? What is the purpose behind his questions? Is he friend? Enemy? Or something else altogether?

Version Control, by Dexter Palmer. A woman deals with a strange and persistent sense of everything being slightly off, which may or may not be related to her scientist husband’s pet project, a “causality violation device” that might actually be working.


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